Juniperus Communis

(Juniper Berries)

Catarrhal inflammation of kidneys. Dropsy, with suppression of urine. Old persons, with poor digestion and scanty secretion of urine. Chronic pyelitis.

Urinary
Strangury; bloody, scanty urine, violet odor (Tereb). Weight in kidney region. Prostatic discharge. Renal hyperemia (Eucalyptol).

Respiratory
Cough with scanty, loaded urine.

Relationship
Compare: Sabina; Juniperus Virginianus-Red Cedar–(Violent tenesmus vesical. Persistent dragging in back; hyperemia of the kidneys; pyelitis and cystitis; dropsy of the aged with suppressed urine. Dysuria, burning, cutting pain in urethra when urinating. Constant urging apoplexy, convulsions, strangury, uterine hemorrhage). Terebinthina.

Dose
Best form is the infusion. One ounce to a pint of boiling water. Dose, one-half to two ounces, or tincture, one to ten drops.

Reference: “Pocket Manual of Homeopathic Materia Medica & Repertory” by William Boericke
Juniperus Communis
(Juniperis communis. Juniper. N. O. Gymnospermæ of the Coniferæ. Tincture of fresh ripe berries.)

Clinical.─Dropsy. Dysmenorrhea. Hæmorrhages.

Characteristics.─Juniper has not been proved, but sufficient is known of its action to warrant its inclusion, and to show the analogy between its action and that of J. Sabina. Gin owes its distinctive properties to the oil of juniper berries, and that is why this spirit is in such popular repute as a remedy for dysmenorrhea. It has a very powerful action on the kidneys, and has cured cases of renal dropsy. Hale also commends it in certain coughs with scanty, loaded urine. He says German doctors use Juniper much in gastric affections, abdominal flatulence and colic.

Relations.─Compare: Junip. virg., Sabina, Tereb.

Reference: “A Dictionary Of Practical Materia Medica” By John Henry Clarke